In this post I discuss and explain key aspects of IgG food intolerances testing, why and how to do the test and potential cautions. Other aspects covered include types of food intolerances, causes, symptoms, treatment and a few relevant research studies on the subject.

I offer the IgG test for clients based in Australia who suffer from various chronic health conditions including IBS (bloating, gas, pain, diarrhoea, constipation, reflux), Crohn’s disease, migraines, obesity and overweight, leaky gut, eczema, psoriasis and many more. Find out how to do the test below.

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Food intolerances are becoming more common in both adults and children

Recent studies have found that approximately 15-20% of adults experience food sensitivities or allergies (1). Of these only a small percentage are in fact severe allergies (anaphylactic reactions) mediated by Immunoglobulin type E (IgE) (1). Most common are food intolerances mediated by the Immunoglobulin type G (IgG) characterised by the delayed response food reactions.

As a Holistic Natural Therapist, I focus on good nutrition as a baseline of health, therefore I consider identifying food intolerances as a key step in helping clients to get better. My personal and clinical experience as well as feedback from other practitioners confirm that incidence of food intolerances /sensitivity is on the rise due to a number of factors.

These include microbiome imbalances, having a leaky gut syndrome, impaired digestion (low stomach acid and digestive enzymes), food contamination with chemicals and pesticides (especially glyphosate which causes leaky gut), and many more.

Having taken multiple medications for years without improvements, many clients with chronic conditions are making different treatment choices nowadays. They are applying nutrition and tailored supplementation as potential solutions to their complex health problems, rather than solely relying on the prescription drugs.

In my clinical experience and confirmed by many research studies, there’s validity to and reliability of the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay) testing for IgG-mediated food intolerances. Undertaking an elimination diet based on the results, can be an amazing aid to the management of or recovery from many diseases.

Recently, I teamed up with Nicholas Greene, a holistic Chiropractor at Greene Chiropractic, who also utilises IgG food intolerance testing to help solve challenging or complex cases, with impressive results. I help his patients who took the test to interpret the results and follow the elimination diet, making sure all food groups are present to avoid any nutrient deficiencies, and support their digestion, if required.

Recent studies have found that approximately 15-20% of adults experience food sensitivities or allergies (1). Of these only a small percentage are severe allergies (anaphylactic reactions) mediated by Immunoglobulin type E (IgE) (1). Most common are food intolerances mediated by the Immunoglobulin type G (IgG) characterised by the delayed response food reactions.

What are immunoglobulins and their types

Immunoglobulins (also known as antibodies) are proteins produced by the immune system, in particular white blood cells, that are manufactured in response to foreign bodies entering the body via the mucosal surfaces of the body i.e. the digestive tract including gut lining, mouth and nasal passages.

There are several types of immunoglobulins (Ig) that have different functions, with IgA, IgE, IgG, IgM being the most known. IgG is the most common antibody produced by the body.

The terms food allergy, sensitivity and intolerance are all